The Project

MGC 1R

The project was born from an online discussion, after a visit to the Cemtery and seeing the condition of it and the Gravestones.
A small number of family historians who until recently had never met but who chatted regularly and helped each other with their particular family history problems and challenges on a family history forum website. The group, who met for the first time on
the inaugural Groundwork Day on 17 October 2010, were drawn together by our passion for family history, our love of
Manchester and Lancashire and our desire to save and preserve historical data.

We don't have any financial support but we do have the full backing of Manchester City Council and their Bereavement Services Team for which we are very appreciative. All the volunteers work with their own equipment - trowels, spades, brushes, rakes, etc., and provide their own transport.

New volunteers are always welcomed at our Groundwork Days (when we meet at the Cemetery to photograph and record) which
are usually on a Sunday morning for 2- 4 hours. Previous experience isn't necessary. All we ask is for a time commitment and
an enthusiastic approach. The team can be contacted via the website contact page.

©MGCTP2010-2018

The Project has now completed the mapping of the Cemetery.

We have transcribed ALL upright and visible gravestones and uncovered and recorded about 99% of buried gravestones. We are still working on the other 1% to be uncovered and recorded.

MGC 2014
MGC 2012

Before After

Alongside the Manchester General Cemetery Transcription Project, Manchester City Council have undertaken a programme of improvements and maintenance within the Cemetery, part of which has involved re-planting fallen, toppled and vandalised gravestones.

The "before" and "after" photographs above, taken in 2012 and 2014 respectively, illustrate the progress that has been made.

RE-ERECTION OF GRAVE STONE

Re-erection of a Gravestone
The Team have work extremely hard to gather all inscriptions from gravestones before their inscription was lost below soil level. Whilst not all was gotten we did manage to get the majority.